Sad incident

Restraining orders aren’t worth shit; I want a Glock.

–a former gf who was in a position to know

Well-known sex therapist murdered, former boyfriend arrested

https://abc7chicago.com/well-known-sex-therapist-murdered-ex-boyfriend-arrested/5938962/

“According to TMZ, Harwick had “recently expressed concerns about an ex-boyfriend.” The Los Angeles Times reports that Harwick applied for orders of protection against Pursehouse twice before, in 2011 and again in 2012. A judge granted Harwick’s request for protection following evidence given by Harwick and Pursehouse. The restraining order ended two weeks before Harwick’s death, according to TMZ.”

https://heavy.com/news/2020/02/gareth-pursehouse/

 

 

 

I have a question …

A friend sent me an email today that I think is very worthy of sharing. He is a twice retired POlice Officer, graduate of the elite Rogers Shooting School, and very seasoned firearms and tactics trainer.

What is your overall opinion of competition preparing you for a real gunfight?

I published my response on my Patreon page, which is generally limited to my subscribers there. It’s an important topic so I decided to make it publicly available. https://www.patreon.com/posts/33975252

More about Refining the drawstroke

An excellent question was posed about Refining the Drawstroke. It’s worthy of repeating and answering in a post of its own because the answer seems counter-intuitive.

Shortest distance between two points is a straight line. He seems to catch with the support hand at the nipple line. We catch just a tad lower. Thoughts?

In this case, the line to follow is the eye-target line not the line from the holster to full extension. The sooner the gun gets into the eye-target line, at least peripherally, the sooner we can begin refining our visual reference of the gun to the target. If the gun is presented straight to extension, the visual refinement cannot begin until the gun reaches extension.

Dry Practice over boxes eye-target line

At this point, I am already achieving a coarse visual reference of the pistol to the target.

Continue reading →

Refining the drawstroke

One of the most common errors in the drawstroke is allowing the pistol to dip below the holster during the draw; this is called bowling. Another common error is bringing the gun up to the eye-target line like an underhand toss, which is called scooping. Both of these errors increase the time of the drawstroke and increase the difficulty of acquiring the sights.

I’ve created a YouTube channel for videos that I plan to make. Here’s the first, a simple technique to get rid of bowling and scooping.

Tactical Professor books (all PDF)

Serious Mistakes Gunowners Make http://seriousgunownermistakes.com

Indoor Range Practice Sessions http://indoorrangepracticesessions.com

Concealed Carry Skills and Drills http://concealedcarryskillsanddrills.com

Advanced Pistol Practice http://bit.ly/advancedpistolpractice

Shooting Your Black Rifle http://shootingyourblackrifle.com

The Value of Spot shooting

#Fridayfundamentals

A friend of mine asked an excellent question on Facebook. “If you were going to pick a target for general training purposes, which of these nine would it be?” He included a photo array of commonly used silhouette targets.

Charles Riggs target question display

My reply was:

Since I am a believer in and practitioner of spot shooting, there’s [sic] none of these I find particularly appealing.

Continue reading →

Making friends with other gun carriers

(second in a series)

DALE CARNEGIE’S SECRETS OF SUCCESS (nee The Golden Book) is a valuable resource for improving our relationships with other members of the gun carrying community. The hard copy I have is six pages long. I’ve kept it on my desk for over 20 years since I went through Dale Carnegie training. The book is available online as a free download.

https://www.dalecarnegie.com/en/resources/dale-carnegies-secrets-of-success

The first part of the book is a three page section called Principles from How to Win Friends and Influence People. It covers three topics.

  • Become a Friendlier Person
  • Win People to Your Way of Thinking
  • Be A Leader

Each of the topics has a series of numbered bullet points that can guide our interactions with people. Here’s how we might apply those Principles in the situation of seeing someone whose way of carrying isn’t what we would ordinarily recommend.

Become a Friendlier Person

1. Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.

5. Smile.

2. Give honest, sincere appreciation.

  • You’re carrying a gun – Excellent!
  • Your holster has a safety strap.

6. Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language.

  • Introduce yourself
  • Ask the other person’s first name if they don’t give it in return.

7. Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves.

  • What kind of gun is that? (Regardless if you know what it is.)
  • How long have you been carrying?
  • Have you done any training?

Questions are powerful, much more powerful than criticism, condemnation, or complaints. By starting a friendly interaction with a person and then asking kindly questions, we have the opportunity to be guides to people who are less knowledgeable than ourselves. It puts us in the position to Win Friends to our community and influence them to Success. Our people skills are the single most powerful weapon in our arsenal.

We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately.

–Benjamin Franklin

Can we be a little less judgmental?

(First in a series)

There’s a picture of a woman carrying a pistol non-doctrinally (i.e., a lot of people are unhappy with the way she’s doing it) circulating on the Internet now. The pistol is in a holster attached to her yoga pants and despite being a small pistol, it’s pulling her pants down some on that side. I’m not going to post the picture because it’s unnecessary to my point. The picture has generated almost universal criticism, the following being typical.

The freedom to carry a gun is a great thing.

But you will never, EVER convince me that carrying a gun without training is smart decision. If you’re untrained[,] you do stupid things like this, which actually puts you and those around you in more danger than if you were unarmed.

Carry a gun. But don’t be an untrained fool about it.

My comment about the picture is:

At least she has a gun and her holster has a safety strap.

“Get some training” is a meme in the industry. Unfortunately, both the size and the availability of the training base are very small. This is true even if every NRA and State certified CCW instructor is included in the number. There’s also the issue in my mind of those who make statements like this but got their training from the government while in the pay of the government. That generates an ethical issue you can ponder some time.

Here’s an infographic about the availability of training to gunowners. The concept of ‘the training base’ is something that people who haven’t had to regularly conduct resource intensive training for a lot of people simply don’t understand. Once again, it’s the Tactical Professor with those pesky little numbery things again.

training base w numbers

That tiny triangle where the three circles overlap is the real availability of ‘training’

And my estimate of training facilities is based on those capable of supporting at least NRA Basic Pistol not any kind of ‘meaningful’ training for carrying a weapon. Basic Pistol or its equivalent is as far as most facilities are prepared to go, for various reasons. I wouldn’t be surprised if the number where holster oriented training is allowed is less than 1,000. The good news is that the NRA Instructor base has grown to over 120,000 so we’re probably under 500 students per instructor now. Other good news is that the NRA Training Department has created a CCW course. However, that will take years to generate any significant number of CCW Certified Instructors.

Here’s my first question:

Did the person who took the picture approach the woman and offer to help her out with her knowledgebase, either personally or by referring her to someone who is a trainer?

As a community, we need to do a better job of the way we interact with beginners and novices instead of just being socially maladroit jackwagons and calling them fools.

More in the next installment.

BTW, my Concealed Carry Skills and Drills eBook would have been a nice reference to point her to or maybe even buy for her if the observer actually really cared about her welfare. Or was finger pointing, ego stroking, and shaming the real object of the exercise?

Tactical Professor books (all downloadable PDF files)

Serious Mistakes Gunowners Make http://seriousgunownermistakes.com

Indoor Range Practice Sessions http://indoorrangepracticesessions.com

Concealed Carry Skills and Drills http://concealedcarryskillsanddrills.com

Advanced Pistol Practice http://bit.ly/advancedpistolpractice

Shooting Your Black Rifle http://shootingyourblackrifle.com

Helicopter crash

Fifteen years ago today.

30 Marines, 1 Sailor killed in helicopter crash

“While we mourn the loss of these heroes, we will honor their sacrifice by continuing our mission to bring democracy to the people of Iraq,” said Marine Lt. Gen. John F. Sattler, commanding general, I Marine Expeditionary Force.

For public release
Col. Robert M. Olivier
IMEFDM G-3 IO USMC

Vallejo Parking Lot Shooting – Collateral Action

off-duty cop shoots and kills father-of-six

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7921335/Video-shows-moment-duty-cop-shoots-dead-man-got-dispute-parking-space.html

How about that as a way to describe a convicted felon who kept “a semi-automatic handgun with a 30-round magazine [in] its hiding place under the hood”

Hat tip to my friend and colleague Greg Ellifritz https://www.activeresponsetraining.net for bringing up the incident. Greg mentioned the fact that concealing weapons [and drugs] underneath the hood is a common technique for the criminal element.

The Vallejo POlice Department posted several videos of the incident on YouTube.

Video #4 is very useful from the collateral action (avoidance of becoming collateral damage) perspective.

It wasn’t these folks’ first rodeo; you don’t see them trying to get video for WorldStar.

Continue reading →

Evaluating handguns for YOU

This subject came up again today and the evaluation criteria are worth repeating.

tacticalprofessor

Before you buy a gun, you should go to a range that rents guns and try different ones out to see which one is best for you.

What does “try them out” mean? How do we measure “which one is best for you?” Here is a list of worthwhile items to evaluate for you to make an informed decision about an autoloading pistol. For those who are helping a prospective purchaser, demonstrate the technique but then place the pistol in a sterile (unloaded with slide forward) condition and let them do their own evaluation without comment or coaching. You won’t be there to coach them if they need to use the pistol for real; that’s part of the evaluation.

  1. Load the pistol. This has two components.
    1. Load a magazine to full capacity.
    2. Load the fully charged magazine into the pistol and chamber a round.
  2. Manipulate the controls of the pistol.

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